U.S. workplace deaths rose in 2019

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports a slight increase in the number of workplace deaths last year as 5,250 fatalities were reported. The rate of fatal injuries on the job remained unchanged from 2017 at 3.5 workers per 100,000.

The lack of improvement in workplace safety led the National Safety Council (NSC) to say employers need to do a better job of protecting their employees.

What are the top 10 most dangerous jobs?

Most worker deaths are related to transportation, followed by fatalities that occur when workers come into contact with objects and equipment. The BLS data ranked the top 10 most dangerous vocations based on death rates per 100,000 workers:

  1. Logging workers
  2. Fishing industry
  3. Aircraft pilots/Flight engineers
  4. Roofers
  5. Refuse/recycling workers
  6. Truck drivers/traveling sales agents
  7. Farmers/other ag workers
  8. Iron/steelworkers
  9. Construction workers
  10. Lawn service/landscaping workers

No improvement was seen in workplace injuries

In addition to the more than 5,000 workers who died on the job last year, more than 2.8 million more suffered nonfatal workplace injuries, which the BLS says is unchanged from 2017. It was the first year since 2012 that the total number of reported cases did not decline.

Along with the lack of progress on the total number of workplace injuries, there was no change in the incidence rate, which is the average days away from work that a person needs to recover from their injuries.

The BLS also says 333,830 injuries resulted in a visit to an emergency room or hospital.

Hold employers accountable for unsafe conditions

Employers have a legal and ethical obligation to provide a safe work environment for their employees by eliminating hazards, creating and enforcing safety standards and providing adequate training for workers and supervisors. If you are injured on the job here in New York, an experienced workers’ compensation attorney can help you receive the benefits you deserve.

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